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Adjuncts

Aeration

Aerobic

Ale

Alpha Acids

Anaerobic

Attenuation

Cerevisia

Chill Haze

Decoction

Esters

Ethanol

Fermentation

Flocculation

Infusion

Isomerization

Kilning

Lager

Lautering

Malting

Mashing

Phenols

Pitching

Protein rest

Racking

Saccharification

Sparge

Tannins

Trub

Wort

Yeast
 

Adjuncts : Generally anything un malted added to the brewing cycle to increase fermentable sugar content. Examples would be: rice, corn, rye, pure sugar.

 

Aeration : Act of injected increasing oxygen in the freshly pitched wort to stimulate yeast growth. This can be done with pure sterile O2 or by splashing or stirring the wort vigorously.

 

Aerobic : oxygen requiring. Yeast go through aerobic and anaerobic phases. Requiring O2 for growth or life cycle.

 

Ale : Top fermenting yeast strains ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae ) produce ales. Generally prefer just below room temperature to perform their tasks.

 

Alpha Acids : Primary hop resin and oils that undergo isomerization when boiled. The iso-alpha-acids from that process give the beer it’s primary bitterness.

 

Anaerobic : Non oxygen requiring. Organisms that can perform their life functions without the presence of O2. Beer yeast go through this phase when they are going dormant or done fermenting the wort.

 

Attenuation : The measurement of how much fermentation has occurred. The more sugars that are consumed in the wort, the lighter ( more attenuated ) the finished beer.  A reading of the wort extract is taken before pitching yeast and then at the end of fermentation. From that, the attenuation can be determined and helps to measure things such as how much alcohol and residual starches/sugars remain in the beer.

 

Cerevisia : Latin for beer. Notice it’s use in Ale yeast naming: Saccharomyces cerevisiae

 

Chill Haze : Haze in beer that can come on when chilled. These are proteins and tannins that have been carried over from the mashing, brewing process into the finished beer. Can be removed via filtration before shipping product to market if necessary.

 

Decoction : German mashing tradition for making bocks, dopples and so forth. By removing part of the mash and heating or boiling separately from the main mash, then reintroducing it back into the main mash. There can be several decocts during this process. Believed by many to be the only way to get the body and mouth feel for the Bock Style.